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Call for Proposals

This Section welcomes proposals for papers sessions, individual papers, and roundtables in all areas of Buddhist studies. The Section is interested in three distinct session types:

  • To facilitate greater exchange among the various subfields within Buddhist studies, we are particularly interested in sessions that confront enduring problems in the study of Buddhism, raise important methodological issues, or bring fresh materials or perspectives to bear on themes of broad interest. Proposals that adopt innovative formats and/or take advantage of options such as ninety-minute sessions are also of particular interest

  • The Section participates in the AAR’s Full Paper Submission Pilot Program and would like to host at least one session in this format this year. For such sessions, the full text of the papers will be made available to members (only) on the AAR Website in advance of the Annual Meeting. At the session, presenters will only briefly summarize their arguments, with the bulk of the time given over to discussion. Panel submissions that intend to follow this format should note this clearly in the proposal

  • Individual paper proposals are also encouraged. Each year, the Section hosts a session composed of the best individual paper submissions. All proposals are welcome and given careful consideration. Please contact the listed organizers if you wish to contribute to the following themes:
    • Buddhist masculinities — Gina Cogan, Boston University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Transformation of oral literatures into textual ones — David DiValerio, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Sacred cities: urban Buddhism in modernizing Asia, 1850–1950 — Gregory Scott, Columbia University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Interdisciplinary approaches to the study of Buddhism — Michael Jerryson, Eckerd College, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Harappa and Buddhism — Roy C. Amore, University of Windsor, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Buddhism and the imagination: reflections on David Dean Shulman’s More than Real: A History of the Imagination in South India (Harvard University Press, 2012) — Benjamin Bogin, Georgetown University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Postwar reconciliation and conflicts with ethnic minorities in Buddhist societies — Mahinda Deegalle, Bath Spa University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Buddhism and Brahmanism — Joseph Walser, Tufts University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Millenarianism and Buddhism — Mariko Namba Walter, Somerville, MA, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Meditation movements and the formation of modern Buddhist identities — Erik Braun, University of Oklahoma, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Buddhist languages/Buddhist lingua francas — Scott Mitchell, Institute of Buddhist Studies, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • Vision, text, and image in Buddhism — Charles D. Orzech, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , and Pamela D. Winfield, Elon University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • A shared reading of Vimalakīrtinirdeśasūtra — Kin Cheung, Temple University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • For a possible cosponsored session with the Chinese Religions Group, gentry religion in Ming–Qing China — Charles Jones, Catholic University of America, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • For a possible cosponsored session with the Confucian Traditions Group, connections between Confucianism and Buddhism — Ken Holloway, Florida Atlantic University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • For a possible cosponsored session with the Japanese Religions Group, early twentieth century Japanese politics and the development of Buddhist studies — Jolyon B. Thomas, Princeton University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , and Bryan Lowe, Vanderbilt University, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

    • For a possible cosponsored session with the Religion and Science Fiction Group, Buddhism and science fiction — Rudy Busto, University of California, Santa Barbara, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Mission

This Section is the largest, most stable, and most diverse forum for Buddhist studies in North America. We embrace the full historical range of the Buddhist tradition from its inception some two-and-a-half millennia ago to the present and span its entire geographical sweep — the Indian subcontinent, Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, China, Korea, Japan, and the West. In addition to being historically and geographically inclusive, we have made efforts to encourage methodological plurality. Papers presented in recent years reflect, in addition to the philological and textual approaches of classic Buddhology, the methods of intellectual history, institutional history, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, gender and cultural studies, art history, literary theory, and postcolonial studies. We will continue to encourage cross-disciplinary exchange. This Section is the forum of choice for many established scholars. For some years now, we have also striven to provide a forum for younger scholars to aid them in establishing their careers. Under normal circumstances, at least one session at the Annual Meeting is devoted to four or five individual papers; often many or all of these are from graduate students or younger scholars making their first academic presentation at a national conference. In recent years, a growing number of foreign scholars have come to recognize this Section as a valuable forum to submit proposals, including scholars whose primary language is not English. We wish to continue to promote communication with scholars abroad and to provide opportunities for younger scholars.

Anonymity of Review Process

Proposer names are anonymous to Chairs and Steering Committee members during review, but visible to Chairs prior to final acceptance or rejection.

Questions?

Lori Meeks
University of Southern California
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Christian K. Wedemeyer
University of Chicago
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Method of Submission

 

This website contains archived issues of Religious Studies News from Winter 2001 through May 2013.

This site also contains archived issues of Spotlight on Teaching (May 1999 through May 2013) and Spotlight on Theological Education (March 2007 through March 2013).

For current issues of RSN, beginning with the October 2013 issue, please see here.


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